Research Data Workshop Series 2019

Over the spring of 2019 the Research Data Service (RDS) is holding a series of workshops with the aim of gathering feedback and requirements from our researchers on a number of important Research Data topics.

Each workshop will consist of a small number of short presentations from researchers and research support staff who have experience of the topic. These will then be followed by guided discussions so that the RDS can gather your input on the tools we currently provide, the gaps in our services, and how you go about addressing the challenges and issues raised in the talks.
The workshops for 2019 are:

Electronic Notebooks 1
14th March at King’s Buildings (Fully Booked)

DataVault
1200-1400, 10th April at 6301 JCMB, King’s Buildings, Map
Booking Link – https://www.events.ed.ac.uk/index.cfm?event=book&scheduleID=34308
The DataVault was developed to offer UoE staff a long-term retention solution for research data collected by research projects that are at the completion stage. Each ‘Vault’ can contain multiple files associated with a research project that will be securely stored for an identified period, such as ten years. It is designed to fill in gaps left by existing research data services such as DataStore (active data storage platform) and DataShare (open access online data repository). The service enables you to comply with funder and University requirements to preserve research data for the long-term, and to confidently store your data for retrieval at a future date. This workshop is intended to gather the views of researchers and support staff in schools to explore the utility of the new service and discuss potential practicalities around its roll-out and long-term sustainability.

Sensitive Data Challenges and Solutions
1200-1430, 16th April in Seminar Room 2, Chancellors Building, Bioquarter, Map
Booking Link – https://www.events.ed.ac.uk/index.cfm?event=book&scheduleID=34321
Researchers face a number of technical, ethical and legal challenges in creating, analysing and managing research data, including pressure to increase transparency and conduct research openly. But for those who have collected or are re-using sensitive or confidential data, these challenges can be particularly taxing. Tools and services can help to alleviate some of the problems of using sensitive data in research. But cloud-based tools are not necessarily trustworthy, and services are not necessarily geared for highly sensitive data. Those that are may not be very user-friendly or efficient for researchers, and often restrict the types of analysis that can be done. Researchers attending this workshop will have the opportunity to hear from experienced researchers on related topics.

Electronic Notebooks 2
1200-1430, 9th May at Training & Skills Room, ECCI, Central Area, Map
Booking Link – https://www.events.ed.ac.uk/index.cfm?event=book&scheduleID=34287
Electronic Notebooks, both computational and lab-based, are gaining ground as productivity tools for researchers and their collaborators. Electronic notebooks can help facilitate reproducibility, longevity and controlled sharing of information. There are many different notebook options available, either commercially or free. Each application has different features and will have different advantages depending on researchers or lab’s requirements. Jupyter Notebook, RSpace, and Benchling are some of the platforms that are used at the University and all will be represented by researchers who use them on a daily basis.

Data, Software, Reproducibility and Open Research
1100-1430, 21st May at G03, Bayes Centre Central Area, Map
Booking Link – https://www.events.ed.ac.uk/index.cfm?event=book&scheduleID=34309
In this workshop we will examine real-life use cases wherein datasets combine with software and/or notebooks to provide a richer, more reusable and long-lived record of Edinburgh’s research. We will also discuss user needs and wants, capturing requirements for future development of the University’s central research support infrastructure in line with (e.g.) the LERU Roadmap for Open Science, which the Library Research Support team has sought to map its existing and planned provision against, and domain-oriented Open Research strategies within the Colleges.

Kerry Miller
Research Data Support Officer
Library & University Collections

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DwD2018 – Videos now on Media Hopper

Dealing with Data 2018 was once again a great success in November last year with over 100 university staff and Post-Graduate students joining us to hear presentations on topics as diverse as sharing data in clinical trials and embedding sound files in linguistics research papers.

As promised the videos of each presentation have now been made publicly available on Media Hopper (https://media.ed.ac.uk/channel/Dealing%2BWith%2BData%2BConference/82256222), while the PDFs can be found on https://www.era.lib.ed.ac.uk/handle/1842/25859. You can also read Martin Donnelly’s reflections on the day http://datablog.is.ed.ac.uk/2018/11/28/dealing-with-data-2018-summary-reflections/.

We hope that these will prove both useful and interesting to all of our colleagues who were unable to attend.

We look forward to seeing you at Dealing with Data 2019.

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We’re hiring!

Information Services has a new vacancy for a Data Safe Haven Operations Assistant to work directly with the Data Safe Haven Manager in the Research Data Support Team in providing operational support for the Data Safe Haven and its users across the University. This is an excellent opportunity for an enthusiastic researcher or professional to apply their academic and support skills to a growing service area, and to help build and raise awareness of our new Data Safe Haven.

You will have research experience and knowledge of current data protection regulations and other relevant legislation in the context of research. You will have an understanding of university structures and norms. You will know how to work methodically and transparently, following and documenting standard operating procedures. You will document and present the service for different audiences to ensure high levels of uptake and engagement with the service.

The Data Safe Haven Operations Assistant is a key role in the development and delivery of the new Data Safe Haven component of the Research Data Service, delivered by Library Research Support together with other sections of Information Services. The role allows the post-holder to contribute to defining the way the Data Safe Haven service will operate within the University, including achieving standards-based certifications.

This is a fixed-term full-time position for two years. Funded by the Digital Research Services programme, you will be part of a collaborative, engaging, and innovative working environment within Information Services. There are many advantages to working at the University. Benefits include flexible working, an excellent pension, career prospects and generous holiday provision.

Closing date: 15th February, 2019

Full details are available at: https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=046776

On behalf of Cuna Ekmekcioglu
Data Safe Haven Manager

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DataVault is now live

After extended development, the Research Data Service’s DataVault system is now operational, adding value to research data for principal investigators and their funders alike by offering a long-term retention solution for important datasets.

DataVault is a companion service to DataShare, the institutional digital repository for researchers to openly license and share datasets and related outputs via the Web. DataVault comprises an online interface connected to the university’s data centre infrastructure and cloud storage.

Each research project can store data in a single vault made up of any number of deposits. DataVault is currently able to accept individual deposits (groups of files) of up to 2 TB each; this will increase over time as project development continues.

DataVault sprint meeting before launch

Immutable

DataVault is designed for long-term retention of research data, to meet funder requirements and ensure future access to high value datasets. It meets digital preservation requirements by storing three copies in different locations (two on tape, one in the cloud) with integrity checking built-in, so that the data owner can retrieve their data with confidence until the end of the retention period (typically ten years).

Secure

The DataVault interface helps to guide users in how to deposit personal and sensitive data, using anonymisation or pseudonymisation techniques whenever possible, as prescribed by the University’s Data Protection Officer (DPO). Because all data are encrypted before deposit, they are protected from unauthorised disclosure. Only the data owner or their nominated delegate is allowed to retrieve data during the retention period. Any decisions about allowing access to others are made by the data owner and are conducted outside the DataVault system, once they have been retrieved onto a private area on DataStore and decrypted.

Discoverable

Although DataVault offers a form of closed archive, the design encourages good research data management practice by requiring a metadata record for each vault in Pure. These records are discoverable on the Web, and linked to the respective data creators, projects and publications.

In exchange for creating this high level public metadata record, the Principal Investigator benefits from the assignment of a unique digital object identifier (DOI) which can be used to cite the data in publications.

The open nature of the metadata means that any reader may make a request to access the dataset. The data owner decides who may have access and under what conditions. Advice can be provided by the Research Data Support team and the DPO.

University data assets

DataVault’s workflow takes into account the possibility/likelihood that the original data owner will have left the university when the period of retention comes to an end. Each vault will be reviewed by representatives of the university in schools, colleges or the Library, acting as the data owner, to make decisions on disposal or further retention and curation. If kept, the vault contents become university data assets.

Plan ahead for data archiving

The Research Data Support team encourages researchers to plan ahead for data archiving, right from the earliest conception stages of the project, so that appropriate costs are included in bids, and enabling the appropriate steps to be carried out to prepare data for either open or closed long-term archiving.

The team can be contacted through the IS Helpline and offers assistance with writing data management plans and making archival decisions. See our service website and contact information at https://www.ed.ac.uk/is/research-data-service or go straight to the DataVault page to learn more about it, get instructions for use, or look up charges. An introductory demo video is available  at  https://media.ed.ac.uk/media/Getting+started+with+the+DataVault/1_h4r4glf7 .

Robin Rice
Data Librarian and Head, Research Data Support
Library & University Collections

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