Interning with the Research Data Service

For almost four months, I have been interning with the Research Data Service (RDS) as a project assistant. I decided to apply for the internship simply because I had received RDS support when I was developing a Research Data Management (RDM) plan for my PhD project and I also wanted to gain experience that would help me develop my professional skills. I was beyond thrilled when I was accepted!

Photo of a sunflower on a window ledge

The RDS team entry to the office sunflower-growing competition

The project I was involved in was called the Dealing With Data Use Case Videos Project. Its aim was to gain insights into the research data management (RDM) practice of data service users in all three Colleges at the University. My main role was to interview academic staff and PhD students as well as support staff about their experiences of RDM and their views on the tools available at the University such as DataStore, DataShare, DataVault and so on. The insights gathered from the interview are valuable for the RDS team to improve their services. For my personal development, interviewing the participants has helped me to gain my confidence and hone my skills which I can directly apply for my PhD research. I also enjoyed learning about different research projects beyond my field and felt inspired by the participants, particularly in how they share their data publicly to advance research on their topic. Another part of my internship (which I found most interesting) was to conduct video interviews. I had the chance to work directly with the Video Production Team of Communications and Marketing and visited their studio. This was my first experience being involved in video filming and editing.

Photo of nameplate on the desk which says Clarissa

My nameplate on my desk

So, my internship now has come to end, but I won’t forget this amazing experience. I was very welcomed to be part of the team, had my own desk, joined some meetings and even out for lunch and drinks! It’s been truly a pleasure to work with such a great team and I can’t thank the RDS team enough for the opportunity to learn so much about the RDS and to extend my knowledge about RDM.

Catherine Clarissa
Research Data Service Project Assistant
Postgraduate Research Student
Nursing Studies, University of Edinburgh

Photo of the office window view showing Edinburgh Castle obscured by a crane

The view from the office window

 

 

Share

The Edinburgh DataShare Awards!

The Research Data Service team applauds those researchers at the University of Edinburgh who share their data. We therefore decided to show our appreciation by presenting awards to our most successful depositors, as part of the Dealing With Data conference. The prizes themselves do not come with a cash research grant attached unfortunately. However, the winners did receive a certificate bearing an image of our mascot for the day, Databot. We think you’ll agree the winning depositors and their data demonstrate the diversity of our collections, in terms of subject matter, formats and sheer size. We were particularly pleased with the reactions from both the recipients and the attendees, both in person, by email and on twitter (#UoEData was the Dealing with Data hashtag). Who doesn’t love the drama of an awards ceremony! A video is available.

Photograph of Pauline Ward announcing the award winners

Photo: CC-BY Lorna M. Campbell

The winners in full…

MOST DATASHARING SCHOOL: Edinburgh Medical School

– the School which boasts the greatest number of Edinburgh DataShare Collections currently. Thirty-three eligible Collections (already containing at least one dataset) such as “Connectomic analysis of motor units in the mouse fourth deep lumbrical muscle”, the Edinburgh Imaging “Image Library” and “Generation Scotland”.

MOST PROLIFIC DATASHARER: Professor Richard Baldock
– the most prolific depositor into Edinburgh DataShare for the academic year 2016-17, and over the lifetime of the repository, having shared a grand total of 1,105 data items with full metadata. These are grouped together into numerous Collections under the heading of “e-Mouse Atlas”. The majority of these detailed images show microscope slides of stained tissue, others are 3D models. They accompany a book and website published by Professor Baldock, building on the seminal work of Professor Matt Kaufman in developmental biology. The metadata for each of the slides links to a lower definition version within the e-Mouse Atlas website, where the data may be viewed and navigated in context. The original slides themselves are held by the University’s Centre for Research Collections.

detail of histological slide showing stained cells

Detail from Elizabeth Graham; Julie Moss; Nick Burton; Yogmatee Roochun; Chris Armit; Lorna Richardson; Richard Baldock. (2015). eHistology Kaufman Atlas Plate 21a image d, [image]. University of Edinburgh. College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/735.

MOST PROLIFIC DATASHARER (CSE): Professor Euan Brechin
– the depositor of the greatest number of Edinburgh DataShare items from the College of Science and Engineering in academic year 2016-2017. Euan deposits his coordination chemistry research data so frequently that we set up a Collection template on the Brechin Research Group, which automatically pre-populates some of the metadata fields for him, saving Euan time. If only we could find a way to mention metallosupramolecular cubes here.

The certificate awarded to Professor Euan Brechin

The certificate awarded to Professor Euan Brechin

MOST PROLIFIC DATASHARER (CAHSS): Dr Andrea Martin
– the depositor of the greatest number of Edinburgh DataShare items from the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences in academic year 2016-2017. Some of these “Language Cognition and Communication” data items are still under temporary embargo. Users may nonetheless see all the metadata.

MOST POPULAR SHARED DATA: Professor Peter Sandercock
– the depositor of the Edinburgh DataShare item which has attracted the greatest number of page views over the lifetime of the repository: “International Stroke Trial database (version 2)” (aka IST-1).  These data from the International Stroke Trial provide a great example of how clinical trial data may be anonymised to allow them to be shared. For more information, you may want to watch Prof Sandercock’s very accessible and detailed  public lecture. Admittedly, one other item is higher up DataShare’s table of page views than IST. However we believe the traffic drawn by “RCrO3-xNx ChemComm 2016” to be artifactual, arising from the appearance of the word ‘doping’ in its abstract, and the fact the deposit was made at a time when doping in sport was very prominent in the news media. Additionally, the earlier, superseded, version of the IST-1 dataset also appears in the all-time top ten, and if we combine the number of views, it is in the No.1 spot outright 🙂

MOST POPULAR DATA 2016-17: Dr. Junichi Yamagishi
– the depositor of the Edinburgh DataShare item which has attracted the greatest number of page views (1,720 to be precise, as counted by Google Analytics) over the academic year 2016-17: “Automatic Speaker Verification Spoofing and Countermeasures Challenge (ASVspoof 2015) Database”. Here’s the suggested citation, which DataShare compiles automatically, and displays prominently, to encourage users to cite the data:

Wu, Zhizheng; Kinnunen, Tomi; Evans, Nicholas; Yamagishi, Junichi. (2015). Automatic Speaker Verification Spoofing and Countermeasures Challenge (ASVspoof 2015) Database, [dataset]. University of Edinburgh. The Centre for Speech Technology Research (CSTR). http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/298.

MOST POPULAR DATA 2016-17 (CAHSS): Professor Miles Glendinning

– the depositor of the Edinburgh DataShare item from the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences which has attracted the greatest number of page views (1,374 to be precise, as counted by Google Analytics), over the academic year 2016-17: “Hong Kong Public Housing Archive”. The Research Data Service is working closely with Miles, Personal Chair of Architectural Conservation, on a series of batch imports to put his fabulous array of photographs of public housing tower blocks from all around the world on DataShare over the coming months – keep an eye on DOCOMOMO International Mass Housing Archive.

Sunny image of the façade of several tower blocks; a tree is visible in the foreground.

Image cropped from “HKI_H_Yue_Fai_Ct.jpg” from Glendinning, Miles; Forsyth, Louise; Maxwell, Gavin; Wood, Michael. (2015). Hong Kong Public Housing Database, 2006-2015 [image]. University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh College of Art. http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/322.

MOST POPULAR DATA 2016-17 (MVM): Dr. Tom Pennycott
– the depositor of the Edinburgh DataShare Collection page from the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine which has attracted the greatest number of page views over the academic year 2016-17: “Diseases of Wild Birds”. Hundreds of grotesquely beautiful photographs of dead wild birds, bodies ravaged with viruses, bacteria and protists, found at locations all around the United Kingdom; these images support the PhD thesis of Dr Tom Pennycott from our Veterinary School.

You can see usage statistics for any DataShare Item or Collection simply by clicking on the “View usage statistics” button on the right-hand-side of the page.

Pauline Ward, Research Data Service Assistant
EDINA and Data Library

Share

Updates from the fourth meeting of the RDM Forum

Guest blog post by Ewa Lipinska

On 28th August members of the RDM Forum gathered in the stunning Old Library at the Department of Geography in the Old Infirmary building, to hear the latest updates from the Research Data Service team and discuss all things data. It’d been a good few months since the last time we met, so the event presented us with the perfect opportunity to catch up on new developments, network with colleagues working on RDM in different parts of the University, and prepare ourselves for the new academic year which will see the University take up a pivotal role in making Edinburgh the Data Capital of Europe.

We started off with an RDM update from Cuna Ekmekcioglu, who gave us an overview of developments to University research data services: the launch of interim DataVault long-term retention service, continuing development of Data Save Haven aimed at research projects dealing with sensitive data, and a new release of DataShare which will allow larger datasets. We also learned about RDM training courses planned for the new academic year, most of which can be booked via MyEd.

Next, Pauline Ward gave a presentation which went into a bit more detail about the DataVault service allowing researchers to comply with their funders’ requirements to preserve data for the long term in cases where the datasets cannot be made public. The current interim service requires a mediated deposit which can be done by contacting data-support[at]ed.ac.uk. Comprehensive guidance on how to prepare your data before storing it in DataVault can be found on the service website.

This was followed by a demonstration of the new Research Data Service promotional video which outlines the range of tools and support offered by the team, and which can be a very good resource for new members of staff who would like to find out about the types of services available. Diarmuid McDonnell who presented the video also gave us a quick overview of a recent project called Scoping Statistical Analysis Support, which looked at the demand for statistical analysis training for current postgraduate students. The final project report is full of current information about statistical training around the University.

We then went on to discuss the potential impact of data sharing, which tied in nicely with a recent panel discussion at Repository Fringe 2017 that focused on how repositories and associated services can feature in supporting researchers to achieve and evidence impact in preparation for the next Research Excellence Framework exercise (live notes from the day are available). Pauline Ward presented examples of popular public datasets by Edinburgh University researchers, described ways to access information about their usage, and talked about how datasets can be shared more widely to engage external audiences, which may lead to potential impact. Even though on their own research data usage statistics are not enough to demonstrate significant impact beyond academia, they are a good (though perhaps still slightly overlooked) starting point for tracking how and by whom datasets are used, and how that benefits individuals and communities.

The meeting concluded with a presentation by Robin Rice, who shared with us the draft Research Data Service Roadmap. As the goals set out in the previous roadmap have now largely been achieved, the time has come to look to the future and identify new objectives for the next few years. It was interesting to hear about the team’s long-term plans which include unification of the service (aiming to ensure the best user experience and interoperability between systems), advocacy of data management planning, support around active data, enhanced data stewardship, improved communications and more training opportunities.

Overall, it was a very useful and informative meeting, and I’d very much encourage anyone interested in research data management and sharing to join us next time. In the meantime Cuna’s slides, together with lots of other useful resources and points for discussion, are available on the RDM Sharepoint (access on request).

Ewa Lipinska
Research Outcomes Co-Ordinator
College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Share

New video about the Research Data Service

The Research Data Service team is delighted to announce a new resource to help researchers and research support staff become familiar with the wide range of tools and support that we offer:

YouTube Preview Image

The video, produced by Senate Media, outlines how the University of Edinburgh Research Data Service can help you access, manage, store, share and preserve your research data. The permanent location for the video on our service website is: http://edin.ac/2hbswRw.

Robin Rice
Data Librarian & Head, Research Data Support
EDINA and Data Library

Share