Publishing Data Workflows

[Guest post from Angus Whyte, Digital Curation Centre]

In the first week of March the 7th Plenary session of the Research Data Alliance got underway in Tokyo. Plenary sessions are the fulcrum of RDA activity, when its many Working Groups and Interest Groups try to get as much leverage as they can out of the previous 6 months of voluntary activity, which is usually coordinated through crackly conference calls.

The Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and others in Edinburgh contribute to a few of these groups, one being the Working Group (WG) on Publishing Data Workflows. Like all such groups it has a fixed time span and agreed deliverables. This WG completes its run at the Tokyo plenary, so there’s no better time to reflect on why DCC has been involved in it, how we’ve worked with others in Edinburgh and what outcomes it’s had.

DCC takes an active part in groups where we see a direct mutual benefit, for example by finding content for our guidance publications. In this case we have a How-to guide planned on ‘workflows for data preservation and publication’. The Publishing Data Workflows WG has taken some initial steps towards a reference model for data publishing, so it has been a great opportunity to track the emerging consensus on best practice, not to mention examples we can use.

One of those examples was close to hand, and DataShare’s workflow and checklist for deposit is identified in the report alongside workflows from other participating repositories and data centres. That report is now available on Zenodo. [1]

In our mini-case studies, the WG found no hard and fast boundaries between ‘data publishing’ and what any repository does when making data publicly accessible. It’s rather a question of how much additional linking and contextualisation is in place to increase data visibility, assure the data quality, and facilitate its reuse. Here’s the working definition we settled on in that report:

Research data publishing is the release of research data, associated metadata, accompanying documentation, and software code (in cases where the raw data have been processed or manipulated) for re-use and analysis in such a manner that they can be discovered on the Web and referred to in a unique and persistent way.

The ‘key components’ of data publishing are illustrated in this diagram produced by Claire C. Austin.

Data publishing components. Source: Claire C. Austin et al [1]

Data publishing components. Source: Claire C. Austin et al [1]

As the Figure implies, a variety of workflows are needed to build and join up the components. They include those ‘upstream’ around the data collection and analysis, ‘midstream’ workflows around data deposit, packaging and ingest to a repository, and ‘downstream’ to link to other systems. These downstream links could be to third-party preservation systems, publisher platforms, metadata harvesting and citation tracking systems.

The WG recently began some follow-up work to our report that looks ‘upstream’ to consider how the intent to publish data is changing research workflows. Links to third-party systems can also be relevant in these upstream workflows. It has long been an ambition of RDM to capture as much as possible of the metadata and context, as early and as easily as possible. That has been referred to variously as ‘sheer curation’ [2], and ‘publication at source [3]). So we gathered further examples, aiming to illustrate some of the ways that repositories are connecting with these upstream workflows.

Electronic lab notebooks (ELN) can offer one route towards fly-on-the-wall recording of the research process, so the collaboration between Research Space and University of Edinburgh is very relevant to the WG. As noted previously on these pages [4] ,[5], the RSpace ELN has been integrated with DataShare so researchers can deposit directly into it. So we appreciated the contribution Rory Macneil (Research Space) and Pauline Ward (UoE Data Library) made to describe that workflow, one of around half a dozen gathered at the end of the year.

The examples the WG collected each show how one or more of the recommendations in our report can be implemented. There are 5 of these short and to the point recommendations:

  1. Start small, building modular, open source and shareable components
  2. Implement core components of the reference model according to the needs of the stakeholder
  3. Follow standards that facilitate interoperability and permit extensions
  4. Facilitate data citation, e.g. through use of digital object PIDs, data/article linkages, researcher PIDs
  5. Document roles, workflows and services

The RSpace-DataShare integration example illustrates how institutions can follow these recommendations by collaborating with partners. RSpace is not open source, but the collaboration does use open standards that facilitate interoperability, namely METS and SWORD, to package up lab books and deposit them for open data sharing. DataShare facilitates data citation, and the workflows for depositing from RSpace are documented, based on DataShare’s existing checklist for depositors. The workflow integrating RSpace with DataShare is shown below:

RSpace-DataShare Workflows

RSpace-DataShare Workflows

For me one of the most interesting things about this example was learning about the delegation of trust to research groups that can result. If the DataShare curation team can identify an expert user who is planning a large number of data deposits over a period of time, and train them to apply DataShare’s curation standards themselves they would be given administrative rights over the relevant Collection in the database, and the curation step would be entrusted to them for the relevant Collection.

As more researchers take up the challenges of data sharing and reuse, institutional data repositories will need to make depositing as straightforward as they can. Delegating responsibilities and the tools to fulfil them has to be the way to go.

 

[1] Austin, C et al.. (2015). Key components of data publishing: Using current best practices to develop a reference model for data publishing. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.34542

[2] ‘Sheer Curation’ Wikipedia entry. Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_curation#.22Sheer_curation.22

[3] Frey, J. et al (2015) Collection, Curation, Citation at Source: Publication@Source 10 Years On. International Journal of Digital Curation. 2015, Vol. 10, No. 2, pp. 1-11

http://doi:10.2218/ijdc.v10i2.377

[4] Macneil, R. (2014) Using an Electronic Lab Notebook to Deposit Data http://datablog.is.ed.ac.uk/2014/04/15/using-an-electronic-lab-notebook-to-deposit-data/

[5] Macdonald, S. and Macneil, R. Service Integration to Enhance Research Data Management: RSpace Electronic Laboratory Notebook Case Study International Journal of Digital Curation 2015, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 163-172. http://doi:10.2218/ijdc.v10i1.354

Angus Whyte is a Senior Institutional Support Officer at the Digital Curation Centre.

 

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Data journals – an open data story

Here at the Data Library we have been thinking about how we can encourage our researchers who deposit their research data in DataShare to also submit these for peer review.

Why? We hope the impact of the research can be enhanced with the recognised added-value of peer review. Regardless whether there is a full-blown article to accompany the data.

We therefore decided recently to provide our depositors with a list of websites or organisations where they could do this.

I pulled a table together, from colleagues’ suggestions, from the PREPARDE project and the latest RDM textbook. And, very much in the Open Data spirit, I then threw the question open on Twitter:

“[..]does anyone have an up-to-date list of journals providin peer review of datasets (without articles), other than PREPARDE? #opendata

…and published the draft list for others to check or make comments on. This turned out to be a good move. The response from the Research Data Management community on Twitter was very heartening, and colleagues from across the globe provided some excellent enhancements for the list.

That process has given us confidence to remove the word ‘Draft’ from the title – the list, this crowd-sourced resource, will need to be updated from time-to-time, but we are confident that we’ve achieved reasonable coverage of the things we were looking for.

Another result of this search was the realisation that what we had gathered was in fact quite clearly a list of Data Journals. My colleague Robin Rice has now added a definition of that term to the list, and we will be providing all our depositors with a link to it:

https://www.wiki.ed.ac.uk/display/datashare/Sources+of+dataset+peer+review

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IDCC 2014 – take home thoughts

A few weeks ago I attended the 9th International Digital Curation Conference in San Francisco.  The conference was spread over four days, with two days for workshops, and two for the main conference.  The conference was jointly run by the Digital Curation Centre and the California Digital Library.  Unsurprisingly it was an excellent conference with much debate and discussion about the evolving needs for digital curation of research data.

San Francisco

The main points I took home from the conference were:

Science is changing: Atul Butte gave an inspiring keynote that contained an overview of the ways in which his own work is changing.  In particular he explained how it is now possible to ‘outsource’ parts of the scientific process. The first is the ability to visit a web site to buy tissue samplesfor specific diseases which were previously used for medical tests, but which have now been anonymised and collected rather than being discarded.  Secondly it is also now possible to order mouse trials to be undertaken, again via a web site.  These allow routine activities to be performed more quickly and cheaply.

Big Data: This phrase is often used and means different things to different people.  A nice definition given by Jane Hunter was that curation of big data is hard because of its volume, velocity, variety and veracity.  She followed this up by some good examples where data have been effectively used.

Skills need to be taught: There were several sessions about the role of Information Schools in educating a new breed of information professionals with the skills required to effectively handle the growing requirements of analysing and curating data.  This growth was demonstrated by how we are seeing many more job titles such as data engineer / analyst / steward / journalist.  It was proposed that library degrees should include more technical skills such as programming and data formats.

The Data paper: There was much discussion about the concept of a ‘Data Paper’ – a short journal paper that describes a data set.  It was seen as an important element in raising the profile of the creation of re-usable data sets.  Such papers would be citable and trackable in the same ways as journal papers, and could therefore contribute to esteem indicators.  There was a mix of traditional and new publishers with varying business models for achieving this.  One point that stood out for me was that publishers were not proposing to archive the data, only the associated data paper.  The archiving would need to take place elsewhere.

Tools are improving: I attended a workshop about Data Management in the Cloud, facilitated by Microsoft Research.  They gave a demo of some of the latest features of Excel.  Many of the new features seem to nicely fit into two camps, but equally useful and very powerful to both.  Whether you are looking at data from the perspective of business intelligence or research data analysis, tools such as Excel are now much more than a spreadsheet for adding up numbers.  They can import, manipulate, and display data in many new and powerful ways.

I was also able to present a poster that contains some of the evolving thoughts about data curation systems at the University of Edinburgh: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.902835

In his closing reflection of the conference, Clifford Lynch said that we need to understand how much progress we are making with data curation.  It will be interesting to see the progress made and what new issues are being discussed at the conference next year which will be held much closer to home in London.

Stuart Lewis
Head of Research and Learning Services
Library & University Collections, Information Services

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